NetGalley Review: Killing Jane (Erin Prince #1) by: Stacey Green

32198502Title: Killing Jane (Erin Prince #1)
Author: Stacey Green
Published: Jan. 31, 2017
Publisher: Vesuvian Books
Pages: 322
Genre: Murder, Mystery
Review: ebook provided by NetGalley and publisher
Buy Links: Amazon, Amazon.uk 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32198502-killing-jane?from_search=true


WHAT IF EVERYTHING YOU’VE EVER HEARD ABOUT JACK THE RIPPER IS WRONG …

A young woman is brutally murdered in Washington D.C., and the killer leaves behind a calling card connected to some of the most infamous murders in history.

JACK THE RIPPER

Rookie homicide investigator Erin Prince instinctively knows the moment she sees the mutilated body that it’s only a matter of time before someone else dies.

She and her partner, Todd Beckett, are on the trail of a madman, and a third body sends them in the direction they feared most: a serial killer is walking the streets of D.C.

THE CLOCK IS TICKING.

Erin must push past her mounting self-doubt in order to unravel a web of secrets filled with drugs, pornography, and a decades-old family skeleton before the next victim is sacrificed.

THE ONLY WAY TO STOP A KILLER IS TO BEAT THEM AT THEIR OWN GAME.



I received this book via NetGalley to give an honest review.

I have to say I really enjoyed this book. Though seeing how much Erin Prince struggled between the issues with her family name got old I understood the significance of it all.
Erin is trying to just be a good detective but with her name being well known will it help her in this case or hurt?
Her new partner Beckett seems like a pretty good partner even takes her outbursts with a little grain of salt. It seems that someone is killing based off of Jack the Ripper but why? Erin and Beckett need to solve the case before more and more people are murdered in a gruesome way but will they be too late? This does deal with sexual abuse and it seems that for Erin it hits too close to home and I have to wonder if she will ever get the therapy she needs. I can honestly say I was very surprised at the twist of who the killer was because honestly I didn't see it. I liked how it took Erin and Beckett until towards the end to put the pieces together. So there was a scene in the book with Erin's brother Brad, and as I read the passage I wondered why would the author put that in there. Unless it was meant to be a filler, but as we got to the end of the story and then it all made sense of why she did that scene.
I felt the characters were well developed and the plot was well thought out. I can honestly see myself reading more of the Erin Prince series. I just hope her and Beckett ease into their working relationship instead of her always coming across hostile.

One quote in the book had me laughing because I am a parent of two that are in school.
"Although with Abby in fourth grade, Erin had begun to realize being a parent essentially meant going through school all over again."






Stacy Green


Green is the author of the Lucy Kendall thriller series and the Delta Crossroads mystery trilogy. ALL GOOD DEEDS (Lucy Kendall #1) won a bronze medal for mystery and thriller at the 2015 IPPY Awards. TIN GOD (Delta Crossroads #1) was runner-up for best mystery/thriller at the 2013 Kindle Book Awards.

Stacy has a love of thrillers and crime fiction, and she is always looking for the next dark and twisted novel to enjoy. She started her career in journalism before becoming a stay at home mother and rediscovering her love of writing. She lives in Iowa with her husband and daughter and their three spoiled fur babies.

She is currently working on a new crime fiction series and is represented by Italia Gandolfo of Gandolfo, Helin and Fountain Literary Management for literary and dramatic rights.




Website: stacygreenauthor.com
Facebook www.Facebook.com/StacyGreenAuthor
Twitter: @StacyGreen26


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