Review: Draw the Dark by Ilsa J. Bick

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Title: Draw The Dark
Author: Ilsa J. Bick
Published: Oct. 1, 2201
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
Pages: 328
Genre: YA
Review: Hardback
Buy Links: Amazon, Amazon.uk, Barnes and Noble














There are things in Winter, Wisconsin, folks just don't talk about. The murder way back in '45 is one. The near-suicide of a first-grade teacher is another. And then there is 17-year old Christian Cage. Christian's parents disappeared when he was a little boy, and ever since he's drawn and painted obsessively, trying desperately to remember his mother. The problem is Christian doesn't just draw his own memories. He can draw the thoughts of those around him. Confronted with fears and nightmares they'd rather avoid, people have a bad habit of dying. So it's no surprise that Christian isn't exactly popular. What no one expects is for Christian to meet Winter's last surviving Jew and uncover one more thing best forgottenthe day the Nazi's came to town. Based on a little-known fact of the United States' involvement in World War II, Draw the Dark is a dark fantasy about reclaiming the forgotten past and the redeeming power of love.


The cover is what drew me to the book I didn't even read the synopsis at all until I went onto Goodreads to add this book to my current reading list. 

This wasn't as scary as I thought it would be with the title being Draw the Dark. Mostly this book is about a young boy who ends up solving a murder that happened back in 1945. The murder is something that has been kind of swept under the rug so to speak.
Christian has had a rough childhood both of his parents have disappeared when he was little and that has led him to draw and paint in a way that makes it almost obsessive. He lived with is Aunt and Uncle until one day he believes he caused his Aunt to die by drawing her death, because of his ability to draw and weird things happening to those that are around him people find him to be weird and try to stay away from him. The one thing that is on his mind constantly is a door that appears on his wall without a knob, what does it mean? He does want to find out but what will it cost him?
Because of this one day he finds himself in trouble and has to do community service in a home for the elderly, this in turn sets off the events that has Christian wondering what is going on with himself and what it all has to do with the past. 
It seems that Christian's brain is like an opening for being a psychic in a way so to speak it is hard to put into words unless you read the book. 
I enjoyed the mystery surrounding the murder of the past and was very surprised at the ending when Christian solved the truth. 
My only issue with the book is why when Christian got angry enough he could draw the future of those that made him mad and they would end up dying in some way. When the bully that pretty much singles him out is bullying him constantly he doesn't do anything until towards the end of the book. Now I could understand why as it all becomes clear but it was a bit of why keep the bullying going in a way. 
Christian was a character you felt sorry for at times, but really appreciate the talent he has in drawing. 
Over all a good story for all to enjoy even though this is a YA I would recommend it for the teens to read. 
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